Dupuytrens Contracture
By Pedro J. Loredo, M.D. III
September 05, 2019
Category: Uncategorized
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What is Dupuytren’s Contracture?

Dupuytren’s Contracture is a condition which causes a thickening of the fascia (the connective tissue) in the palm of the hand just below the skin. Nodules and cords of thickened connective tissue form and can eventually begin to pull the fingers in toward the palm, in severe cases preventing full extension of the fingers. Dupuytren’s Contracture most commonly affects the tissue connected to the ring and little fingers, but can move across the palm to affect the whole hand. This condition is most prevalent in males over the age of 40 of Northern European and Scandinavian descent, but anyone can be affected.

What Are the Symptoms of Dupuytren’s Contracture?

Symptoms of Dupuytren’s Contracture include the following:

  • Curling in of the fingers toward the palm of the hand (most commonly the ring and little fingers)
  • Growth of nodules within the connective tissue in the palm of the hand
  • Lack of ability to grip and muscle weakness in the hand
  • Pain, aching and/or itching in the affected areas

NONSURGICAL OPTIONS:

Considering treatment with XIAFLEX® a nonsurgical option for dupuytrens contracture? The following step-by-step guide can help you get a better grasp on treatment with XIAFLEX®. You can also visit the XIAFLEX website at https://dupuytrens-contracture.xiaflex.com.

Step 1: Injecting XIAFLEX®

Treating Dupuytren’s contracture with XIAFLEX® is performed in your doctor’s office. Your doctor will:

  • Inject XIAFLEX® directly into the cord that is causing your finger(s) to bend
  • * If you have more than 1 contracture, your doctor may give you 2 injections in 1 of your hands during your visit
  • Wrap your treated hand with bandages
  • Advise you to keep your hand elevated until bedtime
  • Advise you to limit the movement of your treated finger(s)

Do not bend or straighten the treated finger(s) yourself.

Step 2: Extending your finger(s)

Your first follow-up visit with your doctor will be approximately 1 to 3 days later.

  • Your doctor will try to extend the treated finger(s) and “break” the cord. This is to help straighten your finger(s). Your doctor may use local anesthetic during this procedure to make it more comfortable

After the extension procedure, your doctor:

  • Will give you a splint to wear on your treated finger(s) at bedtime for about 4 months
  • Will provide simple finger exercises for you to do daily

Step 3: Checking your progress

  • Return to your doctor about 30 days later to have your finger(s) examined
  • Depending on your results, or if the cord(s) is still present, you may need additional injections, approximately 4 weeks apart

If you are experiencing any of the symptoms associated with Dupuytren’s Contracture or would like to learn more about it or the different treatment options please call today. Loredo Hand Care Institute, Dr. Pedro Loredo (972)939-4974 or visit our website at www.loredohands.com

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Grapevine, TX & Dallas, TX Hand Surgeon Loredo Hand Care Institute 220 North Park Blvd Suite 100 Grapevine, TX 76051 (972) 939-4974 Call For Pricing Options