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By Pedro J. Loredo, M.D. III
September 05, 2019
Category: Uncategorized
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What is Dupuytren’s Contracture?

Dupuytren’s Contracture is a condition which causes a thickening of the fascia (the connective tissue) in the palm of the hand just below the skin. Nodules and cords of thickened connective tissue form and can eventually begin to pull the fingers in toward the palm, in severe cases preventing full extension of the fingers. Dupuytren’s Contracture most commonly affects the tissue connected to the ring and little fingers, but can move across the palm to affect the whole hand. This condition is most prevalent in males over the age of 40 of Northern European and Scandinavian descent, but anyone can be affected.

What Are the Symptoms of Dupuytren’s Contracture?

Symptoms of Dupuytren’s Contracture include the following:

  • Curling in of the fingers toward the palm of the hand (most commonly the ring and little fingers)
  • Growth of nodules within the connective tissue in the palm of the hand
  • Lack of ability to grip and muscle weakness in the hand
  • Pain, aching and/or itching in the affected areas

NONSURGICAL OPTIONS:

Considering treatment with XIAFLEX® a nonsurgical option for dupuytrens contracture? The following step-by-step guide can help you get a better grasp on treatment with XIAFLEX®. You can also visit the XIAFLEX website at https://dupuytrens-contracture.xiaflex.com.

Step 1: Injecting XIAFLEX®

Treating Dupuytren’s contracture with XIAFLEX® is performed in your doctor’s office. Your doctor will:

  • Inject XIAFLEX® directly into the cord that is causing your finger(s) to bend
  • * If you have more than 1 contracture, your doctor may give you 2 injections in 1 of your hands during your visit
  • Wrap your treated hand with bandages
  • Advise you to keep your hand elevated until bedtime
  • Advise you to limit the movement of your treated finger(s)

Do not bend or straighten the treated finger(s) yourself.

Step 2: Extending your finger(s)

Your first follow-up visit with your doctor will be approximately 1 to 3 days later.

  • Your doctor will try to extend the treated finger(s) and “break” the cord. This is to help straighten your finger(s). Your doctor may use local anesthetic during this procedure to make it more comfortable

After the extension procedure, your doctor:

  • Will give you a splint to wear on your treated finger(s) at bedtime for about 4 months
  • Will provide simple finger exercises for you to do daily

Step 3: Checking your progress

  • Return to your doctor about 30 days later to have your finger(s) examined
  • Depending on your results, or if the cord(s) is still present, you may need additional injections, approximately 4 weeks apart

If you are experiencing any of the symptoms associated with Dupuytren’s Contracture or would like to learn more about it or the different treatment options please call today. Loredo Hand Care Institute, Dr. Pedro Loredo (972)939-4974 or visit our website at www.loredohands.com

By Pedro J. Loredo, M.D. III
September 05, 2019
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

Spider webs were used as bandages in ancient times.

Did you know spider webs serve another purpose other than being the home of your friendly, neighborhood spider? Spider webs make for an excellent natural treatment for healing cuts and scrapes! In ancient Greece and Rome, doctors used spider webs to make bandages for their patients. Spider webs supposedly have natural antiseptic and anti-fungal properties, which can help keep wounds clean and prevent infection. It’s also said that spider webs are rich in vitamin K, which helps promote clotting.

Spider webs are incredibly strong. It’s made from silk produced from the body proteins of the spider, turning it into silk through spinnerets. The spinnerets are located on a spider’s abdomen. Each spider has three or four spinnerets. Inside the spinnerets are numerous spigots connected to a single silk gland. The spider silk starts out in liquid form. As the material is being drawn out of the spider’s body, it begins to harden. This movement changes the structural components of the silk.

Using cobwebs or spider webs has been done since ancient times when Greeks and Romans treated wounded soldiers with it to stop bleeding. Soldiers would also use a combination of honey and vinegar to clean deep wounds and then cover the whole thing with balled-up spider webs.

An open wound treated with a cluster of spider webs will dry out faster. Spider webs have antifungal and antiseptic properties that keep bacteria away, minimizing the chances of an infection. As long as the web is clean, it will not cause any infection or aggravate the wound’s condition at all.

t’s easy to make your own bandage. First, you have to look for a clean spider web — you want a freshly spun web or one that does not have insect corpse in there. If the spider’s in there, remove the little critter carefully and harvest the web.

Then, ball up the spider web and stuff it onto the wound. Make sure all edges are covered by the web. The web has to touch the surface of the wound. Get a sterile cloth and cover the wound with it. This helps secure the web on the wound while also protecting the affected area from the elements. And there you have it, your own bandage made from spider web.

If the spider web has hardened on your wound and it’s hard to remove, just run your wound over warm water. The water will loosen the web, making it easier to remove.

By Pedro J. Loredo, M.D. III
September 05, 2019
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

You formed my inmost being; you knit me in my mother’s womb.I praise you, because I am wonderfully made Psalm 139: 13-14

Website:  www.loredohands.com  Office:  (972) 939-4974   LOREDO HAND CARE INSTITUTE, Dr. Pedro Loredo, hand surgeon, Bedford, Colleyville, Euless, Fort Worth, Grapevine, Haltom City, Hurst, North Richland Hills, Southlake, Keller, Roanoak, Westlake, Trophy Club, Haslet, Arlington, Richland Hills, Haltom City, Irving, Las Colinas, Dallas,  Grand Prairie, Saginaw, Melody Hills, Lake Worth

Having a child with Down syndrome

Is like taking the scenic route.

You still get where you are going.

It may take a little longer,

But it will be well worth the trip!

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Grapevine, TX & Dallas, TX Hand Surgeon Loredo Hand Care Institute 220 North Park Blvd Suite 100 Grapevine, TX 76051 (972) 939-4974 Call For Pricing Options